Feinherb showpiece – Molitor’s Zeltinger Himmelreich 2016

There are four different grades of sweetness according to German and EU wine law: dry, semi-dry, semisweet and sweet, in addition, one also finds the term feinherb. A term probably only used in Germany, which should convey to the consumer that the wine has a fine, slightly herb note, even though or just because it is not dry.

In various wine lexica it can be read that a feinherb wine, such as a semi-dry one, has a residual sugar content of 9 to 18 g / l, whereby the sugar may not be more than 10 g / l above the acidity. This is true for … Read more ...

Feinherb to sweet Muscat wines

Moscato Weine

… and all priced below 10 €. We tasted three different muscat wines, two sweet wines: a gold muscatel from the winery Erste + Neue from South Tyrol and a Moscato from Gallo from California, plus a feinherb muscatel from the winery Kesselring from the Palatinate.

All are muscat wines, but of at least two different varieties: Gold Muskateller and Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains, provided that the feinherb wine from Palatinate has been made from yellow muscatel.

For quick readers ahead: None of the wines could be one of our favorites – more in the conclusion. All wines were tasted blindly.

Muskateller feinherb Bio 2014, Winery Kesselring
light pale … Read more ...

Feinherb Rieslings below 10 €

Feinherbe RieslingeThe term feinherb is used to my knowledge exclusively in Germany and often in connection with Riesling. Good dry Rieslings can be found for less than 10 euros, even in the wine shop.
So I ordered three feinherb Rieslings (tasted wines), feinherb at least according to the seller – all three under 10 €. 
The Rieslings have been produced by VDP wineries, so not exactly unknown manufacturers. From the Rheingau came the Riesling 2014 Finesse of the winery Kuenstler with 12.5% Vol. Alcohol and the Steinberger Riesling 2013 feinherb of the Staatsweingut Kloster Eberbach, from the Mosel the Riesling 2014 of the St. Urbans-Hof – both with … Read more ...